In my last post I summarised what I’ve been able to discover about Henry Crabb Boulton (1709 – 1773), the politician and leading figure of the East India Company who was a distant relative of mine. In this post, I want to explore what we can learn from Henry’s will, and to trace the lives of his heirs and descendants.

As I noted in the previous post, Henry Crabb Boulton’s brother Richard, a captain in the service of the East India Company, married Frances Heames in 1738. I’ve found records of the christenings of three children born to Richard and Frances, who sometimes went by the surname Crabb and sometimes Boulton, which can makes searching for them in the records problematic.

St Helen's Bishopsgate

St Helen’s Bishopsgate today

On 3rd December 1746 Richard Crabb the younger was baptised at the church of All Hallows Staining in the City of London. On 26th August 1752 Henry Crabb was christened at the church of St Helen Bishopsgate. On 13th October in the following year, a daughter named Frances was christened at the same church. We know from Richard Crabb Boulton’s will that, as well as his house in Crosby Square, Bishopsgate, he also owned property in Chigwell, Essex.

When Henry Crabb Boulton made his will in Agusut 1773, a few months before his death, his nephew Henry was one of the main beneficiaries. There is no mention in the will of a nephew named Richard or of a niece named Frances. One source at Ancestry claims that Frances or Fanny Crabb married Josiah Ogilvy of Datchet in Buckinghamshire but I’m not convinced this is the same person.

Other beneficiaries of Henry’s will included his brother Richard and his cousin Elizabeth Collibee née Jemblin, daughter of his mother’s sister Grace, who had been married to James Jemblin. Also benefitting from the will was a certain Captain Augustus Savage, who seems to have worked for the East India Company, and a number of Henry’s household servants.

Valentines, Ilford, in 1771

Valentines, Ilford, in 1771

Just over a year after Henry Crabb Boulton’s death, his nephew Henry was married. On 3rd November 1775, at the same church in Bishopsgate where he had been christened twenty-three years earlier, Henry Boulton Esquire, as he now styled himself, married Juliana Raymond. She was the daughter of Sir Charles Raymond of Valentines, a country house in Ilford, Essex. Charles Raymond was another retired East India Company captain who had sailed with Henry’s father Richard, becoming a wealthy man as a result of the private earnings he acquired on his many voyages for the Company. In 1754 he bought Valentines from Robert Surman, a banker with investments in the EIC.

Juliana Raymond had an older sister Sophia who married Sir William Burrell, Member of Parliament for Haslemere, and grandson of Charles Raymond’s uncle, Hugh Raymond, who had himself served as an East India Company captain earlier in the century. Juliana also had a younger sister, Anna Maria, who married Thomas Newte, a second cousin. Newte had also come up through the ranks of the EIC to become a captain, working in close association with the Raymond family. Sadly Anna Maria died in 1781, two years after they were married.

Richard Crabb Boulton died in 1777, but he had made his will in 1764, which explains why he left money to his brother Henry, who in the event would predecease him. The principal beneficiary is his wife Frances, but his sons Richard and Henry are also to inherit – so we know that Richard survived until at least 1764. However, there is no mention of his daughter Frances.

Richard Crabb inherited his brother Henry’s house at Thorncroft after the latter’s death, and I assume that on Richard’s death in 1777 his son Henry took possession of it.

After he husband’s health declined, Juliana’s sister Lady Sophia Burrell moved to Deepdene in Dorking, about five miles from Thorncroft. Sophia achieved fame as a poet and dramatist. She published two volumes of collected poems in 1793, the Thymriad from Xenophon, and Telemachus. In 1796 William Burrell died, with Lady Burrell having had two sons and two daughters by him. On 23 May 1797 she remarried to the Reverend William Clay. In 1800 Sophia produced two tragedies. The first was Maximian, the second was Theodora, dedicated by permission to Georgiana Cavendish, Duchess of Devonshire.

Eliza de Feullide (via Wikipedia)

Eliza de Feullide (via Wikipedia)

Some time ago I corresponded with Nicholas Ennos, the author of an intriguing book about the novels of Jane Austen, which he controversially argues were written by Austen’s cousin Eliza de Feuillide, who was also married to Jane’s brother Henry. Eliza, who was a close friend of Sophia Burrell, was widely believed to be the illegitimate daughter of Warren Hastings, the Governor General of India. Warren Hastings was a  friend of Sir Charles Raymond. Ennos claims that in Jane Austen’s novel Emma (published in 1815), the town of Highbury is based on Leatherhead and the house of the heroine’s father, ‘Hartfield’, is based on Henry Crabb Boulton’s house at Thorncroft.

Henry and Juliana baptised 10 children while living at Thorncroft. These were: Frances (1776), Richard (1777), Sophia (1778), Juliana (1779), Maria (1782), Harriet (1783), Emma (1784), Henry (1786), Charles (1788), and Louisa (17910.

I’m grateful to a contributor at Rootsweb on Ancestry for the information that follows. In 1781 Henry Boulton bought the manor of Pachenesham and built a new house at Gibbon’s Farm which was named as Gibbon’s Grove. He also bought an estate at Headley and Barnet Wood Farmhouse in Leatherhead. In 1809 he was insuring three farms: Thorncroft, Gibbons Grove and Bocketts. London directories show that he occupied town houses from at least 1792 at 5 Tavistock Square, 12 Upper Gower Street and at 9 Abingdon Street. He was  a member of Sun Fire Company as early as 1784 and was also Governor of ‘The Corporation for working Mines, Minerals and metals in Scotland’ whose office was in the Sun Fire Office in Cornhill.

Henry retired in 1825 and his son Charles succeeded him. In 1800 he was listed in the London Directory as being with the Sun Fire Office in Craig’s Court. Insurance policies show his interest in shipping also. In 1809 he insured the vessel Worcester lying in the East India Docks.

Juliana died before him on 20th December 1813. When Henry died in 1828 his property passed to his son Richard but this son died in 1859 without issue. The estates then passed to his brother Charles Boulton’s second son John Boulton who had been to Mauritius and was a Captain in the Royal Artillery with addresses in Hammersmith and Edinburgh. So he became the owner of Givons Grove, and Bocketts farm, Leatherhead, and sold Thorncroft.

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